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When people lie to themselves

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Joined Sep 10, 2015
Messages 1,482
I have never had the personality type that is okay with lieing to myself. I don't understand those who do have such a personality, but I recognize that most of the population does.

I was watch RT - Russian Televison, English language edition - and they were talking about the U.S. birth rate being lower per 1000 women. In the 50s and 60s, the birth rate per 1,000, per year, was 120 kids. Currently, as of 2013, the birth rate is 60 per 1,000 women.

The report from RT cites the cost of raising children as a reason. The station claims that it costs $10,000 in hospital fees - including insurance coverage - to have a baby and that is one of the reasons as to why the birthrate is so low.

Now, think about this cited number - $10,000 to give birth in a U.S. hospital. Does it sound true?

NO.

Go to any government housing/welfare building in the U.S. (or Canada) and you will find people who don't work, but have children. How, if giving birth costs $10,000, do these people have their children born in such a U.S. hospital?

How do the Mexicans who cross the boarder illegally to naturalize their children afford the fee at the U.S. hospitals they visit?

How many people have $10,000 in spare funds sitting in their accounts - even white people born and raised in the U.S? Yet, all these white people still have babies.

Human beings even lie to themselves, as well as others.
 
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cristycurves

Guest
To Which of your personalities are you referring?
 

Ms.MelodyMerlot

Well-known member
Advertiser
Joined Jun 7, 2016
Messages 107
is this a serious question??

The total cost of baby delivery typically consists of: the services of the obstetrician/gynecologist and pediatrician; services of the anesthesiologist and epidural, if used; the cost of your stay in the hospital room and board; a nursery fee; laboratory fees; and any medications or medical supplies. If you are insured, your insurance provider probably will receive the itemized bill, but you might receive separate non-itemized statements from the hospital and the different doctors.Typical costs:


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  • The biggest factors affecting the cost of a birth are: whether it is vaginal or Cesarean; whether there are complications; and the length of the hospital stay. Geographical location also plays a part; baby delivery is most expensive in the Northeast and on the West coast and least expensive in the south. For patients not covered by health insurance, the typical cost of a vaginal delivery without complications ranges from about $9,000 to $17,000 or more, depending on geographic location and whether there is a discount for uninsured patients. The typical cost for a C-section without complications or a vaginal delivery with complications ranges from about $14,000 to$25,000 or more.
  • For patients with insurance, out-of-pocket costs usually range from under $500 to $3,000 or more, depending on the plan. Out-of-pocket expenses typically include copays -- usually $15 to$30 for a doctor visit and about $200 to $500 for inpatient services for delivery. Some insurance plans only cover a percentage -- usually about 80 to 90 percent after a deductible is met, so you can easily end up reaching your yearly out-of-pocket maximum. In most plans, that ranges from about $1,500 to $3,000. According to a study by the March of Dimes Foundation[SUP][1][/SUP] , the average out-of-pocket cost for a vaginal delivery for privately insured patients was $463 and for a C-section, $523.
  • Usually, the baby receives a separate bill, which typically ranges from $1,500 to $4,000 for a healthy baby delivered at term. For a premature baby with complications who has to spend weeks in a neonatal intensive care unit, this bill can reach tens of thousands of dollars.
  • Baby delivery usually is covered by health insurance. Even if you join a group health insurance plan after you already are pregnant, delivery still will be covered; according to the U.S. Department of Labor[SUP][2][/SUP] , the federal government prohibits group health insurance plans from treating pregnancy as a pre-existing condition, or, if they offer maternity coverage, from refusing to cover prenatal care or childbirth. However, individual health insurance plans can legally treat pregnancy as a pre-existing condition, so baby delivery probably will not be covered if you join one while pregnant. If you are insured, it is very important to check with the insurance company about their requirements; some companies require you to "pre-authorize" coverage for your baby, and some require that you call them when you arrive at the hospital to deliver -- if you forget, they might refuse to cover the delivery or your newborn's care.
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in the past it was common for the woman to stay home and raise the kids, therefore daycare costs were not an issue, which they now are, today being a SAHM is considered a luxury by most women, as these days to make ends meet the majority of families have both parents working, sometimes several jobs.
also, kids are expensive, and can be exhausting.
the also often smell bad when they are small, and then when they are teens they smell even worse.
trust me i know :-/ lol
also the more kids you have, the harder it is to give each kid enough individual attention, as well as working, cleaning the messes they make and doing all the laundry ect...
women also have a lot more choice these days, birth control is more available, as are abortions, leading to less births.

i think there is a huge variety of reasons why people don't have as many kids these days.


** i am just sitting all lazy on my veranda enjoying the weather, and browsing forums, dont mind me, im borrrred :) **
 
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cristycurves

Guest
We all do when we have nothing else to do.

Do we? I don't like being harsh, or sarcastic, but if someone continually makes posts that are either negative, condescending, critical, bigoted, and all knowing and they then post about how they aren't who they portray themselves to be, how else should one respond.
and :) I post here because I like it here, I've always other things to do, I'm good at time management, I make time for all, apparently you do as well, lol:)
 

Wise Guy

Reviewer
Joined Aug 13, 2010
Messages 2,753
 
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