Made with Love
Toronto Passions
Toronto Girlfriends

Obese People Outnumber Underweight People for First Time in Human History, Study Says

  • Welcome to the new CAERF.
    New management and more commited than ever! Have a look at some of the new features HERE.
    If you experience any issue please let us know in the proper forum.
C

cristycurves

Guest
Butch said:
They love KFC and Pizza but not themselves.

That's a very good point and great observation:) since many people stress eat or eat to soothe themselves and it's never healthy foods they choose. My opinion, places like kfc, burger king, macdonalds should be banned and considered health risks same as cigarettes. It's not fair that my tax dollars go to support a health care system that is over worked because of peoples bad choices and habits. Not the best way to think perhaps, but it's how I feel.
 

peace

Reviewer
Joined Dec 23, 2010
Messages 29,082
Anto said:
Too many fast food restaurants here and our eating portion is often too large. In other countries especiallly in ASIA that I have been to, I would find myself eating healthy food that was being cooked in front of you. Portions were smaller but so fulfilling and delicious. I barely go to any franchised restaurants. No wonder I would return home feeling much lighter and healthier.
 

JessieJames

Reviewer
Joined Dec 31, 2013
Messages 775
The difference is overweight people live to eat where as fit people eat to live.

This makes all the difference in the world.
 

Prim0

Senior Member
Joined Jun 29, 2010
Messages 10,859
I can't help that I love chocolate chip cookies!!!!!! They call to me!
 

oldguyzer

Reviewer
Joined Jun 19, 2011
Messages 15,082
I've heard just about every excuse about why people get "overweight". It almost always comes down to being too lazy to watch what they eat and exercise, and a lack of respect, for both themselves and others they interact with.







I'm fed up of the bullshit "medical" excuses as to why someone gets overweight and can't do anything about it. Bullshit!
 
G

Guido

Guest
I don't feel too bad after reading this.


[h=1]NEW SURVEY SAYS AMERICANS ARE FATTER THAN EVER[/h]By May 26, 2016


We'd offer up some kind of medal or award, but apparently odds are pretty high that somebody would eat it.

According to CNN, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted their annual National Health Interview Survey last year, and it looks as though Americans are fatter than they have ever been.


A record 30.4 percent of Americans at least 20 years of age surveyed in 2015 said they were obese. In 1997, that number was "only" 19.4 percent. The biggest group of fatties fall between the ages of 40 and 59, with 34.6 percent of them waking up every morning in the obese category.

Obviously, Americans' diets are the big culprit behind their consistent rise in obesity, but the same survey said only 15.1 percent of Americans at least 18 years of age are now smoking on a regular basis, which is way down from 24.7 percent in 1997. And anybody who has ever seen what happens to somebody when they give up cancer sticks knows what we're getting at here.

And in what is definitely a related story, 9.5 percent of Americans at least 18 years of age said they have diabetes compared to just 5.1 percent in 1997, so good work, kids. More Skittles and Mountain Dew!
 

Creepy

Senior Member
Joined Mar 1, 2011
Messages 1,104
Good old America.

mericans’ obesity rates have reached a new high-water mark. Again.
In 2015 and 2016, just short of 4 in 10 American adults had a body mass index that put them in obese territory.
In addition, just under 2 in 10 American children — those between 2 and 19 years of age — are now considered obese as well.

The new measure of the nation’s weight problem, released early Friday by statisticians from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, chronicles dramatic increases from the nation’s obesity levels since the turn of the 21st century.
Adult obesity rates have climbed steadily from a rate of 30.5% in 1999-2000 to 39.8% in 2015-2016, the most recent period for which data were available. That represents a 30% increase. Childrens’ rates of obesity have risen roughly 34% in the same period, from 13.9% in 1999-2000 to 18% in 2015-2016.

Seen against a more distant backdrop, the new figures show an even starker pattern of national weight-gain over a generation.
In the period between 1976 and 1980, the same national survey found that roughly 15% of adults and just 5.5% of children qualified as obese. In the time that’s elapsed since ”Saturday Night Fever” was playing in movie theaters and Ronald Reagan won the presidency, rates of obesity in the United States have nearly tripled.

The new report, from the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics, measures obesity according to body mass index. This is a rough measure of fatness that takes a person’s weight (measured in kilograms) and divides it by their height (measured in meters) squared. For adults, those with a BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 are considered to have a “normal” weight. A BMI between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight, and anything above 30 is deemed obese. (You can calculate yours here.)

Obesity rates for children and teens are based on CDC growth charts that use a baseline period between 1963 and 1994. Those with a BMI above the 85th percentile are considered overweight, and those above the 95th percentile are considered obese.
The report underscores a continuing pattern of racial and ethnic disparities when it comes to weight. Obesity rates among African Americans and Latinos have been consistently higher than those seen in whites, and the new survey shows no change in that pattern.

In adult Latinos and non-Hispanic blacks, obesity rates for 2015-2016 were 47% and 46.8%, respectively. Some 37.9% of non-Hispanic white American adults were obese in the latest tally.
Among non-Hispanic Asian adults, obesity rates were at 12.9%.

The racial and ethnic disparities were heavily driven by women: while white men and women were equally likely to be obese, rates of obesity in black women (54.8%) and Latinas (50.6%) were strikingly higher than among their male counterparts (36.9% and 43.1%, respectively).

Patrick T. Bradshaw, who studies population health at UC Berkeley, says the new statistics underscore that turning the tide on obesity will require more aggressive and targeted efforts.
The rising obesity levels “suggest that we haven’t been successful in efforts to reduce or prevent obesity in the population,” Bradshaw said. He echoed a growing consensus among public health experts that if progress is to be made in driving down obesity rates in the population at large, campaigns may need to focus on the specific challenges faced by Latinos and African Americans — especially women — in weight management.

The report does suggest a very modest measure of progress in the fight to reduce obesity rates. Compared to obesity prevalence data from 2013 and 2014, the newly reported rates do not represent a statistically significant change.
BMI is widely criticized as an imperfect way to gauge an individual’s health prospects. Aerobic fitness levels and waist-to-hip ratio are sometimes viewed as better measures.

But the BMI’s near-ubiquitous use in research on weight and disease risk has yielded unmistakable evidence of obesity’s dangers. In large populations, research has shown, higher rates of obesity shorten lives and drive up the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular disease and chronic conditions such as diabetes and arthritis.

Nearly 4 in 10 U.S. adults are now obese, CDC says - LA Times
 

Prim0

Senior Member
Joined Jun 29, 2010
Messages 10,859
Guido said:
I don't feel too bad after reading this.


NEW SURVEY SAYS AMERICANS ARE FATTER THAN EVER

By May 26, 2016


We'd offer up some kind of medal or award, but apparently odds are pretty high that somebody would eat it.

According to CNN, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted their annual National Health Interview Survey last year, and it looks as though Americans are fatter than they have ever been.


A record 30.4 percent of Americans at least 20 years of age surveyed in 2015 said they were obese. In 1997, that number was "only" 19.4 percent. The biggest group of fatties fall between the ages of 40 and 59, with 34.6 percent of them waking up every morning in the obese category.

Obviously, Americans' diets are the big culprit behind their consistent rise in obesity, but the same survey said only 15.1 percent of Americans at least 18 years of age are now smoking on a regular basis, which is way down from 24.7 percent in 1997. And anybody who has ever seen what happens to somebody when they give up cancer sticks knows what we're getting at here.

And in what is definitely a related story, 9.5 percent of Americans at least 18 years of age said they have diabetes compared to just 5.1 percent in 1997, so good work, kids. More Skittles and Mountain Dew!


Good old America.

mericans’ obesity rates have reached a new high-water mark. Again.
In 2015 and 2016, just short of 4 in 10 American adults had a body mass index that put them in obese territory.
In addition, just under 2 in 10 American children — those between 2 and 19 years of age — are now considered obese as well.

The new measure of the nation’s weight problem, released early Friday by statisticians from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, chronicles dramatic increases from the nation’s obesity levels since the turn of the 21st century.
Adult obesity rates have climbed steadily from a rate of 30.5% in 1999-2000 to 39.8% in 2015-2016, the most recent period for which data were available. That represents a 30% increase. Childrens’ rates of obesity have risen roughly 34% in the same period, from 13.9% in 1999-2000 to 18% in 2015-2016.

Seen against a more distant backdrop, the new figures show an even starker pattern of national weight-gain over a generation.
In the period between 1976 and 1980, the same national survey found that roughly 15% of adults and just 5.5% of children qualified as obese. In the time that’s elapsed since ”Saturday Night Fever” was playing in movie theaters and Ronald Reagan won the presidency, rates of obesity in the United States have nearly tripled.

The new report, from the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics, measures obesity according to body mass index. This is a rough measure of fatness that takes a person’s weight (measured in kilograms) and divides it by their height (measured in meters) squared. For adults, those with a BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 are considered to have a “normal” weight. A BMI between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight, and anything above 30 is deemed obese. (You can calculate yours here.)

Obesity rates for children and teens are based on CDC growth charts that use a baseline period between 1963 and 1994. Those with a BMI above the 85th percentile are considered overweight, and those above the 95th percentile are considered obese.
The report underscores a continuing pattern of racial and ethnic disparities when it comes to weight. Obesity rates among African Americans and Latinos have been consistently higher than those seen in whites, and the new survey shows no change in that pattern.

In adult Latinos and non-Hispanic blacks, obesity rates for 2015-2016 were 47% and 46.8%, respectively. Some 37.9% of non-Hispanic white American adults were obese in the latest tally.
Among non-Hispanic Asian adults, obesity rates were at 12.9%.

The racial and ethnic disparities were heavily driven by women: while white men and women were equally likely to be obese, rates of obesity in black women (54.8%) and Latinas (50.6%) were strikingly higher than among their male counterparts (36.9% and 43.1%, respectively).

Patrick T. Bradshaw, who studies population health at UC Berkeley, says the new statistics underscore that turning the tide on obesity will require more aggressive and targeted efforts.
The rising obesity levels “suggest that we haven’t been successful in efforts to reduce or prevent obesity in the population,” Bradshaw said. He echoed a growing consensus among public health experts that if progress is to be made in driving down obesity rates in the population at large, campaigns may need to focus on the specific challenges faced by Latinos and African Americans — especially women — in weight management.

The report does suggest a very modest measure of progress in the fight to reduce obesity rates. Compared to obesity prevalence data from 2013 and 2014, the newly reported rates do not represent a statistically significant change.
BMI is widely criticized as an imperfect way to gauge an individual’s health prospects. Aerobic fitness levels and waist-to-hip ratio are sometimes viewed as better measures.

But the BMI’s near-ubiquitous use in research on weight and disease risk has yielded unmistakable evidence of obesity’s dangers. In large populations, research has shown, higher rates of obesity shorten lives and drive up the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular disease and chronic conditions such as diabetes and arthritis.

Nearly 4 in 10 U.S. adults are now obese, CDC says - LA Times



 

About this Discussion

12 Replies
847 Views

CAERF Community

CAERF is an all purpose Canadian adult community offering advertisers, reviews, and lots of adult fun. The site includes Forums, News, Galleries, Publications, Classifieds, Events and much more!
Full Forum Listing
Top Bottom