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46 million enough if your kids is crushed by a dresser?.

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Prick

Reviewer
Joined Jun 20, 2018
Messages 339
London (CNN Business)Swedish furniture maker Ikea will pay $46 million to the family of a California toddler who died after being crushed by one of its dressers.
Jozef Dudek was two years old when he died in May 2017 after an Ikea Malm dresser toppled onto his neck, resulting in injuries that caused him to suffocate, according to the family's lawyers.
Jozef Dudek was two years old when he died in May 2017.


Jozef Dudek was two years old when he died in May 2017.
Feldman Shepherd, the legal firm that represents the Dudek family, said in a statement that the payout is the largest wrongful death settlement related to one child in US history.
A spokesperson for Ikea confirmed the $46 million settlement. The company apologized in a statement.


"While no settlement can alter the tragic events that brought us here, for the sake of the family and all involved, we're grateful that this litigation has reached a resolution," an Ikea spokesperson said.
"Product safety is a top priority for Ikea and at the core of the design process every day. Again, we offer our deepest condolences to the family," the spokesperson added.
In 2016, Ikea paid $50 million to the families of three other children who had been killed by Malm dressers and agreed to redesign the product to higher safety standards.
"Nevertheless, millions of the unsafe older model dressers remain in the homes of consumers around the country," said Feldman Shepherd, which represented the families in these earlier cases.

There have been eight reports of child deaths involving Ikea chests and dressers, according to the company's US website.
Fake and dangerous kids products are turning up for sale on Amazon

Fake and dangerous kids products are turning up for sale on Amazon

Since 2016, it has recalled 17.3 million units in the United States and received nearly 300 reports of incidents causing 144 injuries to children.
A lawsuit filed by the Dudek family in June 2018 alleges that Ikea knew of the deaths associated with the dressers but "failed to take adequate measures" to improve their safety and stability.
As part of the settlement, Ikea has agreed to broaden its outreach to consumers about the Malm product recall, according to the family's lawyers.
The lawyers said the furniture maker will also meet with representatives of Parents Against Tip-Overs, an advocacy group lobbying for safer furniture designs and more stringent testing standards.


https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/07/business/ikea-malm-dresser-settlement/index.html
 

ROBERTSON

Senior Member
Joined Mar 27, 2018
Messages 1,410
Really unfortunate about the child.

But does anybody actually think that everybody would install said dressers correctly to eliminate tip overs, if instructions indicated how ?

And do parents also need to share some blame, or is it always somebody else's fault.
 

Jessica Rain

2
Advertiser
Joined Aug 12, 2014
Messages 1,234
Really unfortunate about the child.

But does anybody actually think that everybody would install said dressers correctly to eliminate tip overs, if instructions indicated how ?

And do parents also need to share some blame, or is it always somebody else's fault.

That was my thinking.

People know to secure dressers to the wall right? Same with Tv stands, hutches, etc?

I have a bathroom vanity that goes over the toilet. It is secured to the wall for safety.

Unless there was no instructions in the box for doing that, I can't see how IKEA is totally responsible here.

But we are talking about a child death so you can't really publicly blame the parents without even further backlash
 

DILLIGAF

Reviewer
Joined Nov 22, 2016
Messages 1,221
That was my thinking.

People know to secure dressers to the wall right? Same with Tv stands, hutches, etc?

I have a bathroom vanity that goes over the toilet. It is secured to the wall for safety.

Unless there was no instructions in the box for doing that, I can't see how IKEA is totally responsible here.

But we are talking about a child death so you can't really publicly blame the parents without even further backlash
Why can you not blame the parents in this?
They are 100% responsible for the care and safety of that child.
Nothing is idiot proof except stupidity.
People need to stop looking for the golden hand out and accept the responsibility for the actions they take.
 

DILLIGAF

Reviewer
Joined Nov 22, 2016
Messages 1,221
I meant that sarcastically.

It is non-PC to blame parents publicly for their child's death.
Thats what you say!
I however am from a different era.
If the shoe fits wear it.
Crying with sympathy and telling these incompetent idiots that it is the fault of the store or manufacturer is not going to accomplish anything.
Just stop and think about the poor next kid they have.
Some people should just not be allowed to raise children.
 

ROBERTSON

Senior Member
Joined Mar 27, 2018
Messages 1,410
Thats what you say!
I however am from a different era.
If the shoe fits wear it.
Crying with sympathy and telling these incompetent idiots that it is the fault of the store or manufacturer is not going to accomplish anything.
Just stop and think about the poor next kid they have.
Some people should just not be allowed to raise children.
I think you'r missing the ladies point, she is stating that its not politically correct today, to blame anybody for anything of this nature, especially publicly.

I think she is actually agreeing with you, and even me,... :)
 

DILLIGAF

Reviewer
Joined Nov 22, 2016
Messages 1,221
Thanks robbie but I am not missing her point. That is why I clicked like on her post.
Sorry to Jessica if that is how you interpret my post.
I am just reinforcing the fact of today's society that wants to claim money from anybody, or any company because of their own inability to accept responsibility for their actions.
 
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